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How can you share or reuse your data, and with whom?

Sharing data

There are a number of different ways and different services that can be used to share data. Which service is most suitable depends on what kind of data you have, and how you want to make the data available. Some services to consider:

  • subject-specific services, such as the Corpus server at the Humanities Lab, look for more repositories at Re3data

Re3data

  • national repositories, like Swedish National Data Service SND or UK Data Service

Swedish National Data Service SND

UK Data Service

  • tools for open research, like Zenodo or Figshare

Zenodo

Figshare

  • journals, either regular journals in which data can be made available in connection to a published article, or specific data journals where the purpose is to make datasets available. One example of the latter is Research Data Journal for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Research Data Journal for the Humanities and Social Sciences

If you are to share data with others you need to know whether you are allowed to do so. If your data contains sensitive information, personal data or copyrighted material, the ways in which you can share your data are restricted. If you want to make it available, it must be de-identifyed first.

Please contact the library if you have any questions about where to share your data.

Use standardised licenses, for example, CC-licenses, to clarify how your data may be used.

Different types of CC-licenses

Reusing data

The services and platforms above may serve as a way to find existing data for further use. A great deal of cultural heritage data and public sector data is openly available to download. Many of these data sources use open APIs that facilitate the download.

When using someone else's data, make sure that the citation includes the copyright owner, version (if applicable), information about where the data is stored (for example, use a DOI or another type of persistent modifier).

How to cite your data

Contact: Research Support Service

Questions? 

E-mail us at ref [at] sambib [dot] lu [dot] se or contact:

Librarian:
Ann-Sofie Zettergren
Phone: 046-222 16 92

maja [dot] carlson [at] sambib [dot] lu [dot] se (Maja Carlson)
Phone: 046-222 09 94

Sara Rondahl
Phone: 042- 35 65 73